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233 Responses to Social Media: Should you fake it till you make it?

  1. Sarah says:

    I see all kinds of fakers out there, I feel really sad for them. On one hand they want to give over the appearance of success on the other they are struggling to make a success of the things they are advising others to do. It must tear you apart inside.

    Bruce Severn, Trey Pennington and other such tragic stories will come to light and hopefully those that are tempted down this route will think twice.
    Sarah recently posted..Warning: Using pop ups will grow your email list fastMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Sarah. I too see lots of fakers and am lucky I can spot them but many newbies can’t and aspire to them and copy their methods and wonder why they’re not making the success thought they would be…

      It really is a very difficult decision to make though so I sympathise and can understand why people do but as you say with more of these tragic stories coming to light maybe people will think twice about the way they market themselves.
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    • This Blog makes so much sense. I thought when I first began that it would be as easy as those emails we all get, “make $50,000.00 over night, you are connected to the whole world via the Internet, just send this email and collect!!!!!-
      However if those receiving those emails only understood how much work it is to gain true credibility online, then they would never fall victim to that lie. Such tragedies could be avoided by being honest with our selves.
      I have purchased 52 domains to secure my “land grab” of the domain market, that’s over $700.00 investment. Now I spend countless hours to just put content upon them in my spare time, and countless hours building fan pages and blogs and yet have thousands of dollars to invest to develop the domains with quality content. This is only the beginning of a “hope” to becoming a “real” online marketer someday. In case someone reading this did not know, it’s a lot of work, learn to spot them like Lilach, se has some great views and awesome insight!
      I love your book-”5 Crazy Ways
      p.s. CashFLowTweetsDotCom is under development, by me, the owner of it!

      • Lilach says:

        Thanks Paul, really appreciate your great comment about my ebook and also how refreshingly honest you are about your experience.

        I’ve said it before, if it was so easy, everyone would be doing it:)

        Best of luck with your project and keep in touch and let us know how you get on:)
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    • DrDeadline says:

      Through 40+ years in the business I’ve worked hard to learn and grow through the many major paradigm shifts that have brought us into this remarkable era of social media marketing. Most of my peers now own little restaurants in obscure little towns. They are not the problem.

      The masses of millenials, with their misplaced sense of self worth and undeserved entitlement are the culprits. Take a hint. Hit the “Escape” key and go find as real job.

  2. Babs Saul says:

    I’d love a world where there were no fakers, Lilach. Of course that’s not going to happen and if my own honesty and open-ness puts some people off, well so be it. I’d rather people knew that even those of us who’ve been at it for a long time are finding it tough – that approach is more likely to have a positive result overall, even if not directly for me. Being true to yourself is what it comes down to – whether that brings riches, in monetary terms, well I doubt it, but I certainly can’t be any other way even if I wanted to “fake it”.

    It’s horrible that some feel the need to do this and keep it going before cracking in such a destructive way.
    Babs Saul recently posted..WordPress Store Options: 5 of the best shopping cart pluginsMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Babs – it’s refreshing to read your honesty too.

      I doubt there will ever be a world of no fakers.

      I agree it’s so sad that people feel the need to keep up the appearance, it must incredibly hard work and mentally exhausting.
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    • Babs, there are times when I’ve written posts on my blog that are raw and personal concerning my struggle to build a large organization in my primary company, and I cringe to think people are reading it. Yet, I don’t have the heart to put on the mask and pretend I’m anything other than me, hoping that I’ll ultimately connect with other people like myself who are willing to struggle and persevere until we all reach our ultimate goal of freedom. I’m glad to see I’m not the only one. Thank you for being so honest.
      Juli Becker recently posted..Leadership Ladder: The Dynamic Of InfluenceMy Profile
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    • Anita says:

      Babs,

      I love your honesty and one of the many reasons why I like you :)

      I myself would much rather be real than portray being someone or something else, it’s much more important to be real with yourself too.

      I have seen many ‘fakers’ with their masks of fake glory, which in the end is so very sad, as there is always a reason behind it, like deperation.

      In a world where it’s hard, and where jobs / work are on the line everyday, being behind the screen can make it easier to be fake, in trying to persuade themselves that they are a financial success when chaos surrounds them…. life is precious…
      Anita recently posted..Snowdrop Birthday cardMy Profile
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  3. It was very refreshing to read your post Lilach and for someone as well known in the industry to be saying what you have said. We see it all the time and sadly many are teaching that same message “fake it till you make it” We teach our students to be real, and their authentic selves. If they are just starting out then say so and to share what they learn on their journey. What better way to build your brand and provide great content at the same time. It’s what we did and everyone has to start somewhere – just as you did too. We probably put people off because we are honest about what is required to start an online business. Great Great Post :-) PS Looking forward to your appearance on our webshow next week Lilach
    Susan Beesley recently posted..Google Plus For Business LaunchedMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Susan for your comment. Like you I also see it being taught a lot… I love how you teach your students to be real and you really hit on the head – everyone has to start somewhere so why not be authentic and let people join you on your journey. I must admit I’ve lost clients for my bluntness in being so honest. But I would prefer to be honest to someone than tell them a lie which is unrealistic…

      I’m really looking forward to appearing on your webshow next week too:)
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    • Susan, I am glad to hear you are teaching your students to be real and authentic. I plan on teaching mine to do the same – as painful as I feel it might be sometimes. Sadly, this ‘fake it ’til you make it’ mantra crosses the borders into other industries as well, I might add. I first heard it when I was a Realtor, but I learned quickly that most people can see right through that hogwash. Best to remain positive despite less than ideal circumstances than pretend your circumstances aren’t what they truly are. Respectfully, Juli
      Juli Becker recently posted..Lead Prosperity Leads To ProsperityMy Profile
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  4. Lilach, I love this article. I can’t tell you how much this article was needed. There are so many people out there that are portraying themselves as gurus making thousands everyday when that is simply not the case. I have talked with people on the phone who tell me they are struggling, and then I see them post something on Facebook saying “Make a $1000 a day just like me” it’s really sad for sure. I believe someone can show themselves as a positive hard working individual sharing the journey as Chris said above, but not being truthful about it is a spiral down in my opinion. The only way to really make money online of offline, is too “Provide value to the marketplace” if you can provide a service that fixes a problem, you will make money. Thanks again for the article my friend!

    Mark Harbert
    Mark Harbert recently posted..Are You Retooling Yourself To Function In The New Economy?My Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Mark, really appreciate your honest and great comment. I too speak to many people who are struggling and then am amazed when they post up how to make money from Facebook. It’s so misleading but they are just copying what is already there.

      Loving your quote “provide value to the marketplace”. It may take longer but as you say if you can provide a solution that fixes a problem you will make money. You may just need to have a little patience:)
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  5. Wow, thats a really sad bit of news but at the same time, I do agree there an awful lot of fakers out there.

    However, I do believe there is a big difference between a faker and someone who is aspiring to greater things and gives a perception of success, even though they are not there yet. If this is done in a positive way where it is a mindset that sets you on a path to success and by talking the talk, you eventually walk the walk too. There is nothing wrong with this, as long as you are not blagging it and can’t deliver what you say and I think the phrase “fake it until you make it” is kind of relevant – just don’t talk complete BS as people see through that!
    Reminds me of this quote….

    If you want to be successful, be like a duck.
    Above the surface be calm and serene,
    but below the surface, paddle like HELL!!

    Another great post Lilach!
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Stefan. Good to see a slightly different take on it – it’s basically about getting rid of the BS (and unfortunately a lot of people DON’T see past it and hence it continues!!)

      Love your quote:)
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  6. Well the BS happens in every walk of life…. just much easier for people to deliver online! Whether we like it or not, it’s gonna grow so we as viewers and consumers of all this stuff online, just have to be a bit smarter…. or do what people like you are doing…. deliver regular, credible and valuable content, products and services which gives both you and the reader longer term success rather than faking some short term wins and long term fails!!
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    • Lilach says:

      Absolutely Stefan, BS or hype of however you want to call it exists everywhere. I’m amazed that people are still buying products that under deliver – with Google, Social Media and reviews being so easily attainable why they don’t do their due diligence is beyond me!
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  7. Val Heisey says:

    Lilach, your question is definitely about integrity in the industry. Without integrity, one comes across as a used car salesman who will say anything to get the sale. That truly is the most difficult method of getting a sale in my opinion. There are systems available that provide capture pages and free training – all you have to do is set up an autoresponder to create a list of interested people. You are actually giving training that others have used and succeeded with. My only suggestion with these is to pick a training you are interested in too, and implement it. Then, when you get a live person to work with, you have credibility in giving advice on the training. Maybe you will even have success with it!
    Val Heisey recently posted..Create giveaways for list-building – is long content or short content more effective?My Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Val I agree it’s definitely about integrity.

      There are many systems available but at what point are you honest and actually say “hey I’m new but sign up to my lead capture form because the teachings here will show you how to do it and also I can learn along with you”. This to me is where the integrity comes into play. Obviously each product/service is different and it completely varies to what you’re selling.

      But if you’re offering a service where you teach people how to create what you’ve achieved (which is nothing as a newbie!)… when do you decide to do this?… when you’ve achieved success or straight away? If it’s the latter there is clearly some faking going on:)
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  8. Another great post
    Everyone has to start out from somewhere so why fake it! It’s a shame some people do say lies and then let people down by false claims etc. I’m always honest from the start and i know many people appreciate that and then know what they have to do to be a success. This is a really interesting post and looking forward to all the replies as i know there will be many different views.
    Thanks for sharing and looking forward to more great posts
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Lewys. I agree everyone has to start from somewhere – and when starting people have a choice – they can either admit they’re new or lie.

      I’m also looking forward to hearing everyone’s different views:)
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  9. Lilach, Thank you for this article, this should be read by more people and I will share it to all my sites. My wife and I are adamant about not lying and ” faking it “. I think this ” faking it till you make it” gets taken the wrong way by people and they fake it to other people , which in my opinion is lying. I think it was Todd Falcone that I heard say this, “It is not faking other people out that you need to be doing but faking yourself out.” This will project your positive and successful attitude to other people. Most people get this turned around and try to put on a show for others with either flashy clothes cars or exaggerated claims of their success.
    Dean R Black recently posted..How to Lead with Value Using Attraction Marketing PrinciplesMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Dean:) I agree the whole “faking it till you make it” has been taken far too literally! I absolutely love your quote “It is not faking other people out that you need to be doing but faking yourself out” – I hope a lot of people can learn by this statement.

      I actually saw on Facebook how an internet marketer named and shamed (something I don’t and refuse to do) another internet marketer as he had shown pictures of his stunning house and car… done some research and found out that it wasn’t true and managed to locate his real house, took a picture and posted it up on there for everyone to see!

      To be honest flashy cars and houses don’t really impress me and I actually find this marketing approach a turn off rather than a turn on.
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  10. I guess con men and women out there might fake it. I can’t see the point as they will become exposed and slip unnoticed out of view. I am suspicious of anyone claiming to be a social media expert or “guru” and I but will tend to be more receptive to those who recognise there are few absolutes and truths … I just keep my natural filtering switched on and ignore most of what I stumble across.

    Did I tell you I won an award? I didn’t fake it … it was hard work: http://officethingy.blogspot.com/2011/10/officethingy-wins-national-award.html

    • Lilach says:

      thanks Howard. I think it’s good to be suspicious of people. I don’t work with anyone or buy any product without Googling them and doing my research.

      Well done for your (real) award:)
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  11. It’s a sad fact of life that the fakers are probably here to stay. I have seen many of them come and go over the years and as long as there are people who believe in making millions from clicking a few buttons they will exist to prey on these unfortunate souls.

    My advice is to only buy from people that you know or that have a good reputation for quality products and services. Some people use the Internet to hide while others use it to genuinely network. I know which one I prefer.

    Nice post Lila

  12. Lilach, there is another aspect to this. Good old law of attraction wisdom encourages people not to complain and talk about their problems and struggles so as not to further give them energy.
    This a genuine, efficient function and technique to grow into the success we aspire to, on condition that there is an alignment with thought, feelings, word and deed. So not all faking is faking! Until we can know the truths about people’s lives it is unwise to judge or analyse too much. Good topic though! :)

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks, As I said, I do have mixed feelings on the whole faking it! I also like to work on the law of attraction principals. Nobody likes to be surrounded with people who are complaining and most people like to mix with successful people.

      I think it depends on how far you’re prepared to go in order to fake it too….
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  13. You bring up some great points Lilach. I think many people have a dream to success but not a commitment to it. This business is not easy, it is filled with the boring activities and the mundane and self perceived rejection. Being honest with yourself and others is not always easy but it is if you ever want to create a life of significance.
    Terry Petrovick recently posted..How to Get More FREE Facebook Fans for Your PageMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Terry. You’re quite right this business is not easy and it’s incredibly hard work although I love what I do and I would never swap it for the commuting world again!.

      I do believe honesty is the best policy and it’s how you go about portraying yourself online in an authentic way.
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  14. Pingback: Social Media and the Art of Self Deception

  15. Too many fakers online cough Ecademy cough!! Separating the true movers and shakers from the fakers is always difficult. But it must be done. Spotting the fakers may be the difficult part
    Entrepreneur Solo recently posted..Social Media and the Art of Self DeceptionMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Well there are fakers everywhere:) How do you go about spotting them? Do you go down the route of naming and shaming? (something I’ve never done and don’t personally feel comfortable with)
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  16. Joe Sandy says:

    Fake followers, fake comment makers and fake friends don’t buy anything. They don’t read your posts, share your content or engage with you. It means nothing. I let someone set up my fan page in the beginning and put 450 “likes” on there. After “digging” into these “likes,” I found mostly unsavory people or characters or fake pages that I personally did not want on my page. I deleted all of them, changed the fanpage name and started over. Now I’ve got over 800 “likes” that are legit! you’re right! Don’t fake it!
    Joe Sandy recently posted..Keyword Research Is Vital When Learning to Generate Leads OnlineMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Joe, yes you’re quite right people get all excited that you can buy all these things for sometimes as little as $5 but what they’re getting is such rubbish quality. Not only that but I know someone who decided to play the fake game and because he did he had his Facebook Fan Page shut down. Too much activity and it wasn’t used to it!

      One of the other downsides to buying fans/followers etc. is that you can’t see your organic growth and where you’re getting your fans/followers etc. from. Afterall if your’e going to engage with them and write great content, you need to know what they want to hear – not what you think they want to hear:)
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  17. interesting post… such a fine line between faking it and acting as if… one is delusion and illusion and the other a very powerful spiritual manifestation technique… but agree there are a lot of ‘busy’ people who were acting as if and bordering on faking… and for most asking for help without doing it publicly necessarily is going to get them out of their hole rather than staying in the place of illusion and delusion which let’s face it comes from fear! ;-)

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Sarupa, yes that’s one word I haven’t heard today – delusion!!

      I hope more people reading this if they are struggling speak out and get help. There are so many people who are prepared to help and they shouldn’t let fear be a barrier.
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  18. Taz Thornton says:

    Great blog, Lilah – thanks. It’s a difficult one, isn’t it? At Turquoise Tiger, we try to keep authenticity at the heart of everything we do – that’s really the path we walk in life & we don’t believe business should be any different. It’s a sad, sad day when a lack of bull**** becomes your USP, yet that’s what we’re finding. 

    The trouble with PR/marketing/social media is that so many people, with little to no experience, think they can leap on the bandwagon. It’s becoming the new life coaching. What’s worrying is that so many clients don’t seem to know what to look for, end up getting their fingers burned & then tar all of us with the same brush. 

    If you’re experienced & know your stuff there should be no need to fake anything. Starting out on that road is a somewhat unstable foundation for any business. 

    Xx

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Taz – you’re so right, it is such a tricky subject. So many people are jumping on the bandwagon because they think it’s easy – which is a credit to us I suppose, for making it look easy:)
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  19. Im a huge believer in faking till you make it. I’ve done it many times. Perhaps I define it little differently. To me it simply means biting off more than you can chew. And thats a great way to stretch and test yourself. I would never do it to fool someone into thinking I can do something I cant. But if Im 80% sure I can pull something off then the 20% is just crap that needs to get figured out.

    On a related note, I HATE the trend of people using Tony Robbins speak to motivate others while they are clearly only talking to themselves.

    People who talk about “be awesome” and only have an awesome blog to show for (and sometimes not even that) or talk about “be original” and only copy others, get on my nerves. Which is why I LOVE doers.

    Like @nicholas_cardot That dude had created a Twitter game a la Mafia Wars, called Dagaloo. #awesome

    Like @jessicanorthey That girl has the most impressive client list of any social media person I’ve ever known. #awesome

    Like Ana Hoffman aka @WebTrafficCafe who talks about SEO and traffic and is actually able to generate a ton of traffic + engagement from her audience. #awesome

    All these folks are doers and all have my respect.
    Dino Dogan ( recently posted..Why Your Blog Will Never Win Google’s AffectionMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Dino. Appreciate your honesty. As I’ve said, it really is a tricky subject – but I do believe that there is a fine line in faking it and BS.

      I too love doers and @nicholas_cardot, @jessicanorthey and @WebTrafficCafe are great examples – but none of them are faking it – they are practising what they preach and doing an awesome job.
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  20. Not only are you a superbly prolific blogger Lilach, you’re also freshly controversial, which is a great approach, and which got this blog post a mention by Carol Dodsley in her webinar that she delivered this evening.
    As a relative newcomer to online marketing I agree that there must be a element of positive foresight in one’s view of success as there is a steep learning curve to tackle, but, we would never, ever stoop to buy fame and fortune and fakeness!
    We’ve endeavoured to reinforce such point in our new book, Double Click Cash, which is due to be launched in Jan 2012 – and which we’ll need some luck in promoting :)
    Fiona Scott recently posted..The Case Against Joining The Six Figure MentorsMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks so much Fiona, really appreciate your comment. There is a steep learning curve in business and I’m constantly learning.

      Looking forward to seeing your new book out – if your product is good (which I’m sure it will be) you won’t need luck – just a little hard work:)
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  21. Laura says:

    I too have run across these so called “gurus” and have even gotten on the phone with them. (usually to sell me some sort of product, service or Seo promises) Most of the time, I know 10 times more than they do, and they dont have a clue what they’re even talking about. In my business, (affiliate marketing) I always tell people the truth…Internet marketing is NOT easy, You will NOT get rich over night, and if your not willing to Work to build your business, you will NOT make it in this business. It blows my mind how many people are so gullable and fall for program after program from lies and promises perpetrated over the internet. Wake up people! There is no such thing as get rich quick and 99% of those so called mavericks/guru’s can barely pay their bills.
    Laura recently posted..Multi-Pure Announces Pure Convention – PRWEBMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Laura, I 100% agree with you here! It’s interesting as when you finally get to speak with a “guru” often what they are best at is in fact creating a great profile around themselves and yet they know very little. They are just amazing sales guys (nothing wrong in that, we are in business to make money after all). My problem is that I’m too ethical – I find it hard to take money from someone if I know they don’t have the money – even if it means by purchasing my course/mentoring they will better themselves. Instead I direct them to all my free stuff…. and quite often they will come back to me… it’s a slower approach but it does work and I don’t have to feel guilty about selling them something they can’t afford.

      I went to an event recently and there was a lot of pitching going on… the speaker literally hypnotized them into buying from them. It was an amazing art to watch and very very clever – but was it ethical? I knew for a fact that half the people who bought the product couldn’t afford it and would really struggle to pay the monthly payments but these people are desperate and want to get rich quick and unfortunately will learn the hard way – there is no such thing.
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  22. The faking in Social Media can only win in a short term. They would never win in the long run. Just like no one can hide a lie forever. Fake intentions on Social Media scene will reveal these fakes over time. I would honestly say .. if you really want to do social media. Don’t lie, Don’t Fake and Don’t Cheat – the 3Ds of Social Media (yeah I just coined myself LOL)
    Ruhani Rabin recently posted..Panda Update – 5 Fixes For The Latest Google AdjustmentMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ruhani – loving your 3D’s:) I agree and really don’t understand the point of buying followers/fans/testimonials etc. It only takes a few people to have a sneaky look at your followers/fans etc. for them to see how rubbish they are. Plus there will be no engagement and they’re certainly not going to buy from you. So what’s the point? To look good? Vanity is nothing in business – it’s all about profit and the sooner people remember this the quicker they will start to make money.
      Twitter:

  23. John says:

    Hi Lilach
    Thanks for the post. I have been marketing most of my life in different forms. However, about 18 months ago I decided to move my business on line. I did my homework and soon realised that SM is not a 100 metre dash but a cross country, long distance run. I have at times been discouraged but remind myself that doing this is not a quick fix. People out there who promise 1000′s quickly are out of step with reality (unless they have had a lucky break). I think SM creates this ‘virtual mindset’ instead of realizing that we are dealing with real people every day. Thank you once again for your warning. It helps to keep sound business practice at the forefront of our minds.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks John, I love your analogy. It takes time to get results. People always ask me if I can get them the same results as I get from my social media and the short answer is no. It’s taken 3-4 years to get to where I am. It doesn’t happen overnight and there are no quick fixes.
      Twitter:

  24. Hi Lilach
    I think the saying ‘Fake it until you make it’ is another classic example of how good intentions get corrupted by the snake oil salespersons. I’ve been around marketing a long time, around 10 years, and this mantra was originally supposed to give people a mind set. For example to be the success you desire, you must think and behave like that person, if you want to be a millionaire, you act like a millionaire (not in the spending sense :) ) But I think you get the picture.
    Hence the mantra was not intended to perpotrate lies or to give people license to decieve, as it is now.
    It’s another example of a tool that has been mis-used.

    Be the the best

    Peace out
    Dave In Wales
    Dave In Wales recently posted..Retirement MoneyMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Dave – you’re so spot on with this. It’s a shame how people have misconstrued the good intentions as it’s important to have a good mind set and I agree you must think and behave like a successful person. People are naturally attracted to this and gravitate towards it.
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  25. Jenny Braithwaite says:

    Hi Lilach,
    Thank you for writing this post, too many people out there are putting a gloss on things to make it appear that all you have to do is get the numbers up and business will happen. That is so far from the truth, but many people are aware that they need a certain number of followers/fans to be taken seriously, rightly or wrongly. In reality newcomers are often faced with a bewildering choice of advice on how to make a go of social media, so much of it is complete rubbish and even worse can actually hurt you and your business in the longer term. There are many people out there, yourself included, who go out of their way to help people out and to give good ethical advice on social media, I just wish all social media writers were like that. Social media is the buzz idea of the moment which attracts many people for good and bad.

    Faking in social media is no more likely to work in the long term any more than it works in any other field. We all need to learn to be confident in whatever stage of using social media we are at, and don’t be afraid to be a newcomer if that’s what you are!

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jenny. I agree and whilst I appreciate as a newbie you have to start somewhere and want to appear credible. But I would urge any newbie who is serious about their business to create a support network around them. Not only will these people help them but they will also share and comment on their work, which in turn helps raise their credibility. It doesn’t happen overnight, but then nothing good does. Plus we have to learn from it.

      Faking it in social media simple doesn’t work. Being real in business does – the saying “people buy from those they like and trust” is true on and offline:)
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  26. I certainly felt like a fake and an intruder for the longest time, Lilach, simply because my blog grew much quicker than I thought it would and I kept thinking “Why are all these people listening to me when I barely know myself what I am talking about?”

    I think the best cure for this is to find other marketers/business owners who are in the same boat / at the same business stage as you are and get connected. Start a conversation, form a group, and soon enough people will get to know you and you’ll have the most sincere friendships and testimonials because of it.

    Here’s my post on un-faking it: http://www.trafficgenerationcafe.com/make-money-blogging-truth/
    Ana Hoffman recently posted..Best Affiliate Marketing Programs that PayMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ana appreciate your comment. I’m an avid reader of your blog and you come across as incredibly authentic and give value – I certainly wouldn’t have you down as a faker. In my mind there are various different ways of faking – what I don’t like is when someone lies about their income in order to get people to buy from them.

      I completely agree about connecting with others in a similar situation. It’s a great way to learn from one another, support and motivate each other. I still have amazing relationships with the people I started out my first business back in 2006 – we maybe all at very different levels now but it’s fantastic seeing how we’ve all developed and evolved with experience.
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  27. I’ve actually seen the stuff on Fiverr work, but I’ve just started looking into it and wondered whether or not it’s worth doing. Personally, with my Dust Bunny Mafia, I considered using Fiverr to get more people to like my page on facebook. It’d be worth $5 to try, I thought. But then I realized that I would really like to get REAL people on facebook to Like my brand, not fake/spam accounts because those accounts have no interaction. You don’t connect with those accounts, and most importantly, you’ll never convert those accounts into followers that will be willing to support you and your passions.
    Bret Juliano recently posted..Dust Bunny Mafia – Social Media Mini-series Part 2: FacebookMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Bret. Fiverr is a great site, I’ve used it to get Ebook front covers designed, fabulous value:)

      I think the point is it doesn’t matter how much money you spend – whether you buy fans for $5 or $1 or $100 – it doesn’t work and whatever amount you spend, however small you are still wasting your money.

      The only way to get real results is to have real targeted people that you have built relationships with:)
      Twitter:

  28. You know Lilach, this is soo true. What’s funny is that a lot of people in this industry actually made it by faking it lol …that’s why a lot of new marketers fall into that trap. Anyway, I hate social media too because for most people it’s almost impossible to get on other people’s radar without investing money first. The “You scratch my back, I scratch yours” trend is creating gatekeepers in the industry, so to break through you got to basically force your way in.
    Pawel Reszka recently posted..The Make Money Online TrapMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Pawel. Yes there is definitely a job out there for people making money of faking it lol But seriously it is very frustrating as it just perpetuates the situation.

      Please don’t hate social media – it’s so wonderful:) You just need to find the right people who don’t have that kind of mentality. Come and say hello on my Twitter account @lilachbullock and I’ll do a shoutout for people to follow you:)
      Twitter:

  29. Orit says:

    Lately in the news the last person who faked it, Levi Roots, the owner or Reggae Reggae sauce is being sewed for £600,000. Is that really worth it? Yes, i know, he gets now his extra publicity but i am not sure i’d cope with the stress..

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Orit, well fame and fortune has a price. You look at most celebrities who are constantly in the public eye and they may have a lot of money but they have a lot of crap too! The saying money doesn’t buy happiness (although it helps!) is quite true…
      Twitter:

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  31. Cindy Eve says:

    Hi Lilach,
    I absolutely abhor this ‘fake it till you make it’ mindset that has invaded our society in the last few decades. It is rife in the Multi-Level aka Network Marketing industry and you are actively encouraged to ‘fake it’. & because you don’t want to look like a ‘loser’ you try, and try and try to ‘make it’….eventually, like me you end up £50,000.00 in debt from subscribing to the likes of the ‘gurus’ out there who make their money off the desperation of the millions of people who are stuck in their lives (& altho I could I won’t name names, you know who I am talking about). That’s not to say I don’t agree with personal development, I am all for it, and it has certainly opened my eyes to a world I never knew existed, and I learned a lot from doing the multitude of courses I did trying to figure out how to actually ‘make it’…..now it drives me clean up the wall when I hear people saying we should: fake it till we make it. How dishonest is that. So what they are encouraging you to do is to lie to the people you meet, lie to your prospects and then when they find out the truth!!!!! your credibility goes out the window. It’s marketing by fear. Thousands of people want to kick the boring 9-5, have a nice home, go on holidays all the time, wear lovely clothes, have a good bank balance, a nice car, leave a legacy (that’s the one that hooked me) etc etc….so in order to keep up, we are encouraged to use OPM: ‘other people’s money’ (eg banks) to develop ourselves etc etc. It took me 2 years at a cost of £50,000 to learn that very hard lesson. And no I didn’t ‘make it’ simply because I could not ‘fake it’. My integrity was severely challenged and I eventually stopped when I realised that they encourage you to sign up as many people as possible and acknowledge that 80odd % wont make it in the industry…..but that is of no consequence, so long as you sign up as many people as possible…..and the same goes for internet marketing. I was at a course recently where they were actively encouraging a programme that spams people on twitter. When I first heard about the programme it sounded great, but because I am a lot wiser now, I looked a bit deeper and realised the reality behind the programme and how come I have so many bots popping up in my @mentions all the time when I speak about ‘wealth’ or ‘health’ or whatever!! & just don’t mention the word apple…..next thing you will have a flood of links for the apple iphone. So, this ‘fake it till you make it’ mindset should become public enemy number 1, lets start marketing honestly rather than to the pain just to ‘hook’ people (another of my pet peeves). Gee, that felt good to get that off my chest!!! :)
    Thanks for the article.
    Twitter:

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Cindy, I appreciate your comments. Yes I’m also seeing a lot of course teaching people how to “spam” on Facebook and Twitter. I know these methods and it’s actually ironically very hard to make a good income from it. The only people who make money from this are the ones teaching it!

      It is very frustrating but I also think as I’ve said there are different levels of faking it. For me it’s about lying about an income and promising riches which can’t be guaranteed.
      Twitter:

  32. Keala says:

    I like this article. I am a owner of a new start up Motion Picture Production company. It is a lot of work. I had invested a lot of money and time. Into my company, and I am very cautious of the work. I do put on the net. I do know the new socio media present. Has shift people perspective of products. I also know it had help a lot of people too. Yet I think people should take the time to investigate the products. or work that person offers to their customers. I do battle with using socio media. Since it is new and things are not structure. This Author makes a great point.

  33. I wrote something related to this a few weeks ago at: http://www.blokesontheblog.co.uk/how-i-stopped-telling-lies/ In it I mentioned two people who, during the 1970s, were habitual liars. One went to jail. The other to sea. Bruce Serven unfortunately went further than either of them. My heart goes out to him, or rather people like him.

    The problem is that much of the IM industry peddles formulae to vulnerable people who are down on their luck. Before they know it they’re working all the hours that God sends, getting nowhere, are confused, but they’ve picked up a little knowledge and believe by sharing it they too will become ‘gurus’.

    What they fail to realise that information peddled by truly successful marketers is a synthesis of experience, and experimentation. It’s not that, as many hold to be true, that ‘gurus’ aren’t telling people the whole truth, it’s simply that successful people, no matter how poorly they did at school, are intelligent, flexible, original, and can cut to the heart of the matter. They aren’t wannabee copy cats who buy daft schemes from people who’ve never made a dime on-line.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Steve, will check out your article too.

      I have to say I completely agree with you.

      This also opens up the debate of whether someone is naturally successful/entrepreneurial or if they can learn it….
      Twitter:

      • Lilach, I am sure people can learn to be entreprenerial. Indeed I used to teach people in companies something called ‘Servant Leadership’, which was all about taking responsibility in an entrepreneurial kind of way in companies. In one such company the approach released £3 million in stock by increasing the efficiency of the logistics department, whilst retaining staff and raising morale.

        I’m unconvinced, however, that entrepreneurship can be taught as an academic subject in universities as is attempted by some American institutions.
        Stephen Bray recently posted..Greg’s Misconceptions About Branding For Small Business!My Profile
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        • Lilach says:

          Thanks Stephen. I find this subject fascinating.

          I’ve delivered workshops in the past on how to set up a business and I must admit I’ve always been able to tell who will make it and who won’t. I’m not sure whether I believe someone can be taught to be entrepreneurial. I think it’s within you. No one taught me and although I was in the corporate world for many years as soon as I set up my business I found I instinctively knew to do, although don’t get me wrong, I made a few mistakes along the way.
          Twitter:

          • Well, I think one of the traits of entrepreneurs have is their willingness to fail. Virgin Cola comes to mind, great marketing, better product – many more people preferred it over the brand leader in blind trials – wrong opposition. This was not David and Goliath, which is Virgin’s main appeal, so much as David vs Father Christmass.

            If you’ve only made a few mistakes along the way Lilach you’re doing well :)
            Stephen Bray recently posted..[Toyota Yaris] Strange Semiotics From Turkey?My Profile
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          • Lilach says:

            Thanks Stephen. This is a very good point. I’m actually mentoring someone at the moment and he’s unsure whether to proceed, there are many hurdles and decisions for him and part of the problem is he lacks confidence and isn’t a “sales man” or indeed what I would describe as a true entrepreneur. He actually said today that he’s not sure as it’s such a risk. Eureka! Business is a risk! I love your analogy of Virgin Cola, they had such a fantastic marketing and the product was great.
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  34. Thanks so much for this article Lilach. I was just discussing this topic with my boyfriend the other day as we watched yet another “Millionaire” share his secrets about how he earned thousands of dollars in his sleep overnight. And then of course came the grand finale of “How much” he would charge to share his “secret”. “Faking it” in this and many other cases to me is a polite way of saying that they are “lying” – period. And to me, no matter how you slice it- that is just wrong! It is so difficult to know who is “faking it” and who is telling the truth with all the things floating around on the web. What happened to honesty and integrity? My dad was a very successful business man in his day. I was telling him the other day that he wouldn’t recognize, nor would he like, what has become of businesses today – online and offline.

    In my opinion, in time, the “fakers” will be found out – eventually – just not sure when that will be :)
    Julie Weishaar recently posted..Blog Content + Video = VlogMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Julie. I find this whole subject so fascinating.

      I do genuinely think there are different levels of faking it and I think that’s where the problems crack. Particularly when you start lying about income/lifestyle etc.

      I do believe you can be successful in business if you are honest and have integrity. It’s how you position yourself and by being confident and showing that you can deliver what you’ve promised is a good way to go!
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  35. Ann Marie says:

    I read a lot of the comments on here and I 100% agree that is it very frustrating to see so many obvious fakers out there. Especially when you’re first starting out, it is very tempting to buy followers or likes, but as you said above, that makes it nearly impossible to track your organic growth!

    As someone who is just starting out in the industry, I try to have an air of confidence (with everything that I do know what I’m talking about), but if a client or a potential client asks me about something that I am not an expert in, I tell them that! It is tough out there, and I do not want to be the person who causes someone else to not achieve their goals because I pretended to be an expert at something. Plus, as someone stated in a comment (I believe), it is exhausting to be something you’re not!

    So, that’s my opinion on faking it until you make it–confidence is good, but don’t pretend to be something you’re not! It doesn’t help anyone. :)
    Ann Marie recently posted..asthemusicplays: @lilachbullock Great topic! Going to check it out now :) My Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ann Marie. I love your confidence strategy. Confidence is very sexy and people love it when you can be confident. People want to place their trust in you and if you can be confident that you can deliver you’re win every time.
      Twitter:

  36. 20th century rules say fake it, real life says be natural, long term gain over short term sale
    some may disagree I can wait

    What’s so good about faking it, is it because they don’t think they have stories to relate in real life to how we can move forwards? These maybe the people who care, share and help friends and family yet when in bsuienss they become cut throat and selfish. Bringing more of their real life into busienss would change that, but dare they do that?

    I will track back and read all the comments, apologies for not doing so, my take is natural there is no need for biying followers or likes you only need one. once you have one that person will share your information with their one. That’s as long as you are informing and engaging and not broadcasting.

    All we need to do is talk, if you fake talk you’ll be found out quicker now than ever before. Many say that’s just not right, but they are the ones who are afraid that things have changed.

    So I’ll wait, whilst I’m waiting my near 30 years of social networking and building of engaging and long term relationships is most enjoyable.
    Mark Longbottom ( recently posted..design58 moving to tumblrMy Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Mark. Faking it really doesn’t work long term. It’s a short term gain that eventually not only will you jeopardise being found out but then it cripples your reputation and your worse off than when you started.

      Of course as I’ve said, there are many levels of faking it and everyone has their own opinions on how far one would go.
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  37. Yes, you’re right. I also wonder how these people tend to gain their social media fans, or is it just to hard to face the truth? Thank you for this information.
    Angel Collins recently posted..Meet the Kabuki Brushes: Buff Kabuki!My Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Angel. Buying social media fans doesn’t work, the amount of people who said “someone taught me to buy them so I did but nothing happened” is unbelievable. The only people who are making money from buying fans etc. are the ones teaching you to do it!
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  38. Erik Hare says:

    If this industry is ever going to mature we have to root out the fakes and get past the hype. This takes hard work and a strategic mind, not a lot of rah-rah bullshit and constant distraction to the newest stupid fad. We will not be taken seriously by the small businesses that need us the most until these cretins are purged from our ranks.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Erik. Do you think that will happen though? I can’t see it… mainly because although I despise all the lies (fake salaries and lying about how easy it is, you can set up a business in 4 hours a week etc.) there are so many people dreaming of a lifestyle where they can make money online and quickly. So who is to blame, people ignorant enough to believe this can happen or people selling it?
      Twitter:

  39. Conrad says:

    Well, usually single peak on a website gives me an idea of whether someone is a fake or not. Mostly one-page websites raving about successful selling system or an SEO wordpress plugin, which have to be scrolled down for about 3 hours only to get to the huge, orange button saying Add to Cart are either silly affiliates or just fakes.
    It is quite sad, when I first started my business I met loads of spreadsheet millionaires and successful, motivational speaking leaders with 5 linkedin connections no one ever heard of and I feel really sorry for them too. They try to create an illusion of being successful, but in fact they live in denial…

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Conrad. Everyone does different marketing styles, I’ve had debates before with internet marketers who use the long style pages you’re talking about and although I don’t use them the success rates (apparently) are quite high.

      I agree that are a lot of people living in denial and it must be exhausting faking it constantly.

      I do believe that are so many different ways of faking it, some are OK and others like lying about incomes/lifestyles are completely misleading and I can’t stand this.
      Twitter:

  40. I see a lot of this in the industry I am in. I’m contacted on a daily basis by speakers and coaches who claim that they are the best at training and development and show off some flashy website as proof. But once you read through the fluff, you can see that they are struggling to get clients or they have only been in the business for a very short time and really have no experience. Not only is this not good for credibility, but it’s also not good for the people they are coaching (or could be coaching). Personally, I would rather be trained/coached by someone who has achieved the results that I want to achieve, and has proven systems, then someone who only acts like it.

    Authenticity is key in business and the relationships that it builds with your client base. The act-as-if syndrome is something of the past.

    Just my two cents…

    Michael

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Michael, I too am seeing this. It just goes to show that the old fashioned approach does work. i.e. taking the time to network, build relationships etc. and then the sales will flow. Recommendation is also incredibly powerful and I get the majority of my clients via this method.
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  41. Moe says:

    I feel sorry for such a sad story, if a faker managed to have concedired amount of fans and likes in his Facebook I would hire that lier support brands am working on, hehehe, in deed lots of fakers are around, but as the old saying says “you can lie to some people some times … Etc”

  42. CJ says:

    I didn’t read the whole thing, so I apologize if you’ve answered this already: You never answered your own question. “How does a new or start up business gain credibility in the marketplace?” If you don’t fake it, at least at the beginning, a little, you’ll likely have little or no success which put’s you right back where you started. No?

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks. This is a very interesting and good question. First of all surely it depends on what business you set up. For example, my first business was a virtual office. I had over 17 years experience as a PA/Office Manager and yet hadn’t ever run a business. I sold on the back of my experience and had my first client within 10 days of starting. This business grew dramatically and within 2.5 years not only had I moved into offices and was employing staff, won numerous business awards but also sold the business.

      This just goes to show not only the success but how much easier it is to run and set up a business where your skillset lies.

      Let’s take the money making niche. If you’re starting out, the only way to start out is to probably fake it. Which basically means that the majority of people selling these get rich quick schemes aren’t making money and are all faking it. I’m making a general assumption here but maybe this is why the failure rate is so high (rumoured around 97%). There is a reason why it’s such a hard niche.

      I admit you have to start somewhere but by lying about your skill set/experience isn’t a great way of starting… There are many different ways of faking it and for me the only reason why I’ve been so successful in business is because I’ve been so honest and leveraged what I am good at. People buy into that. It helps of course if you’re confident too.
      Twitter:

    • I think this is a crucial question, especially in the make money niche. I completely understand where CJ is coming from but I maintain the stance I wrote earlier in this thread. Don’t do it.

      There is a clear difference between taking an established and successful business model in which you’ve been successful off-line and making a web based system around it, and faking it.

      For example eighteen months ago my wife, who is a qualified psychologist and family therapist with experience in working in major hospitals as well as private clinics, started her on-line practice.

      Because she can reference her training and experience she is credible with a relatively small website, certainly much smaller than this Social-Able, and has an International client base.

      But when I sought some training in how to build businesses on-line, with a few exceptions and notably Ken Evoy’s SiteBuildit, most ‘coaches’ encouraged me to contrive my identity, and post ‘help’ for people wishing to make money on-line. As you may imagine I rapidly parted company with this model.

      Recently I discovered that one of my, mentors, so called, had little idea what they were doing when they launched their ‘coaching’ program. All they really knew was how to market it to others, and attract a host of followers. I believe they’ve gone through a wad of cash and are now struggling to gain a fresh foothold in the marketplace, even though they’re far better qualified to teach now than they were three years ago.

      Today I find it far easier to produce materials, and help, people outside of the ‘make money niche’ than those within it even though it is a huge market. This is Lilach’s site, so it’s not really up to me to offer advice to people setting out to start businesses on the Internet here. If you go back and read some of the other posts at Social-Able, however, you can learn from someone who has cracked the code without recourse to duplicity.
      Stephen Bray recently posted..Greg’s Misconceptions About Branding For Small Business!My Profile
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      • Lilach says:

        Thanks Stephen. The more people who are honest about the money making industry the better.

        It baffles me why people feel the need to lie and fake it in order to get people to buy from them. The problem of course is that is what they are often being taught to do this from their “mentor” (the person they bought the product from) and the whole thing perpetuates.

        People need to learn the virtue of being patient too. Everyone wants fast results, make money quick, 1000′s of visitors to their website within a couple of weeks, 1000′s of followers on Twitter etc. But it doesn’t work like that. It’s taken me years to get to where I am and I’m still learning. I think this is part of the problem and why people feel the need to fake it.
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  44. Th3rdye says:

    Well as a business man If I use an Internet marketer and my numbers aren’t showing improvement then I wouldn’t use that IM and then I would think they could be faking it on what they proposed their services can provide.. As a freelance Internet marketer I understand that success builds off of you network. I tell people who ask me if I’m making money online that I may not be able afford to buy a new pair of Rockports now, but I don’t have to work 40hrs to pay my bills. So it’s not that I’m faking like I’m successful, it’s that I see the road ahead and know that my network will bring me success.
    My personal opinion of success is determined on how many people you can help. Timing also plays apart for success. Like a flower taking time to produce it’s buds, for success you first have to plant the desire to help and let it grow thru the stems of friendship and honesty. As long as deception isn’t in the formula, one can be successful without having a dime in their pocket.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks for your comment:) What I don’t understand is why it matters how much you earn? It doesn’t make any difference and has no reflection on what that person could or would earn? There are so many factors involved which is why people who make claims about making $10k a month for example are so wrong and inaccurate.
      Twitter:

  45. Th3rdye says:

    Well as a business man If I use an Internet marketer and my numbers aren’t showing improvement then I wouldn’t use that IM and then I would think they could be faking it on what they proposed their services can provide.. As a freelance Internet marketer I understand that success builds off of you network. I tell people who ask me if I’m making money online that I may not be able afford to buy a new pair of Rockports now, but I don’t have to work 40hrs to pay my bills. So it’s not that I’m faking like I’m successful, it’s that I see the road ahead and know that my network will bring me success.
    My personal opinion of success is determined on how many people you can help. Timing also plays apart for success. Like a flower taking time to produce it’s buds, for success you first have to plant the desire to help and let it grow thru the stems of friendship and honesty. As long as deception isn’t in the formula, one can be successful without having a dime in their pocket.

  46. Ziz says:

    Having owned a real business with a location, employees and everything else that goes along with it – I had not thought about the term “faking it” in the terms that we have today. I am a big believer of being authentic and that you have to answer to a higher authority at some point – so be legitimate and ask for help if you get stuck at some point.

    :) -

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ziz, appreciate your comment:) I too had a business with offices and employees. You can’t really fake it when you have that:) However as I’m spending more and more time online it’s very easy to “fake it” and I’m seeing an increase in people doing this online which is what spurred me on to write the article. I agree with your comment though – you need to be authentic – more often than not you’re get found out:)
      Twitter:

    • Good point Ziz, surprises me everytime that some business people question being authentic, tehy will get far more respect for asking for help than blagging and faking it. Gradually the reality of being humane will hit home :)
      Mark Longbottom ( recently posted..design58 moving to tumblrMy Profile

      • Lilach says:

        Thanks Mark:) I agree, people need to be more authentic in business. It’s so easy to see through anyway and surely it’s a waste of energy – much better to be positive and confident and totally transparent:)
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  47. Naveen says:

    Do not fake yourself on internet, People will block you as spammer. Just try to be honest and transparent as much as possible, try to give the best tips or content for the readers who can start following you. It will consume time for people to recognize you online. but it worth being honest and transparent.

  48. Kelly Ward says:

    Firstly, great post!

    I believe in “Fake it till you make it” on things like faking confidence when attending a new network group for the first time or when quoting on a job on a bigger scale than I have done before. I believe in some situations it can be a valuable tool to get you through first or difficult encounters but it does have to be backed up with some knowledge.

    If a client asked me to undertake a piece of work I had never done before or asked for advice on a subject I didn’t know about, I would always be honest and say I don’t know but I WILL find out and come back to them! In some cases faking it to try and win business/favour/more followers etc can cost you – not only financially for a problem you would not of known how to foresee, for example, but as in reputation and trustworthiness.

    So I do believe faking it does have its advantages in business but it should never be used a way of building the foundation to your career or reputation.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Kelly:) There are so many different ways of faking it and attending a networking group and exuding confidence to me isn’t a way of faking it’s marketing yourself and make the very best of what you can do.

      For me the real “dirty” side of faking it is when incomes are talked about, fancy cars, nice houses, holidays etc. This is misleading and in my opinion ethically wrong.
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  49. Jo Shaer says:

    It makes me cross. You build your business slowly over time. When I first started out I did service swaps with friends to grow my skills in SEO. When I knew that what I did worked, only then did I start charging small amounts. As my skill increased so did my pricing structure as well as the number of people who were prepared to leave me testimonials.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jo. Yes it’s very frustrating (which is what made me write the blog in the first place).

      I like your business approach:)
      Twitter:

    • Yes Jo, that’s how it should be isn’t it? The trouble is that many ‘mentors’, so called, encourage those new to the field to regurgitate information, often gleaned from others’ blog posts and inaccurate, as means to build their ‘credibility’.

      Then they ask fellow ‘students’ to go to each others’ web sites and comment what a good job they’re doing. The ‘master’ also engages in stunts, such as offering substantial cash prizes for the most creative YouTube video, from followers, praising their skills.

      Sadly people are still taken in by these kinds of shenanigans.
      Stephen Bray recently posted..Greg’s Misconceptions About Branding For Small Business!My Profile
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  50. I think that this is a really dishonest practice and would not feel right engaging in it. I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night knowing that I am lied to people who I expect to trust me, just so I can sell them ideas. Ideas that I claim to work, but in reality may not work at all. I would also feel betrayed if I was following the advice of someone who I later learned was “faking” it. Bottom line — if you are going to be giving people advice, then it needs to be sound advice. If you want people to trust you, then you need to be trustworthy. I am cautious about info products in general and prefer to follow people who are just starting out to see what works and what does not in IM. They will be more likely to say “I tried this and it didn’t work for me,” than to lie to their readers.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Sloane, appreciate your comment and agree:)

      However, newbies are often taught bad “methods” and often also fake it – believing that this is right way.

      I think when buying any product it’s important to really take the time to research not only the product but also the person selling it. Don’t believe in all the hype and just be careful. Easier said than done I admit, I hear a lot of people who spend thousands on products…
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  52. Kate says:

    The thing is with internet marketing you should have some proof that you either worked for someone successful or you can manage your own social sites because experience is little in an industry that is constantly evolving and honestly I always ask why companies want 10 years of social marketing experience???? Ummm do they realize that mainstream social media marketing didn’t really start up until around 2005 when YouTube and FB both started? Sure there were some services before, but they weren’t on the level of any of todays and have either been bought up or died a horrible death or are trying to stay alive *cough* Myspace *cough* anyway I take experience with a grain of salt I say show me what you’ve done and show me what you can do and what advice you offer and what tools you use and then we put you to the test if you don’t see results in 2 months then your with the wrong person. At least that’s what I say.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Kate for your comment. I’m not so sure about the whole proof thing… It’s so easy to pay for “proof” these days. You can literally buy fake reviews, testimonials and it’s been said that some people have photo shopped their income… scary stuff.

      I agree, the proof is in the pudding as they say:)
      Twitter:

  53. Morgan says:

    I think you’re right that there are way too many services in order to help people gain popularity in order to ‘fake it until they make it’. It’s rather discouraging to those who actually work hard and actually know what they’re doing, like us.

    I have had several people try to ride my coat tales by saying they’d like to copy the services that I have and even ask me how I offer the services so that they can straight up do it themselves.

    These days it does seem to be about the popularity game. The more Facebook fans you have, people seem to think that that is a sign that you’re important and they should work with you. But as you pointed out, that’s not always the case.

    I suggest to everyone to do their homework before contacting someone or going with a certain firm. Not only find out the questions to ask, but find out what sort of answers you should be given.

    Thanks for the article, Lilach!

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Morgan, couldn’t agree more:)

      I too get people asking me how they can copy my services and even teach them how to do what I provide(I guess I should be flattered and at least they’re asking my permission!!).

      Now more than ever people need to do their due diligence and as you say “do their homework” and take the time to research people, be it a service or a product you’re going to buy.
      Twitter:

  54. What a great blog and wonderful posts. It was almost as if you were inside my head. I just recently started my online marketing business and I am very against buying followers/friends. So when you have nothing to make you appear credible, what do you do? I didn’t want to fake it so I decided to let the world watch as I organically tried to grow my presence and establish some credibility. It is incredibly scary.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Angie:) It’s such an interesting topic. I’m aware that everyone has to start somewhere… I had to but it’s taken me 4 years to get to where I am, it didn’t happen overnight. I think part of the problem is everyone wants immediate results fast, we have much less patience. But the reality is it just doesn’t work like that…
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  55. I think you’ve hot a nerve here Lilach but its a discussion that needs airing.

    As a professional it comes second nature to me to be generous with free information and advice so that my list/followers see me as a trusted individual they can get to know and trust before they make the decision to “buy” from me.

    Hopefully other professionals will adopt a similar approach as they recognise the benefits of having a strong on-line presence.

  56. Thank you for writing this. Some people are faking it so much, that they start believing in it themselves. The result is that many start-ups have a very distorted picture of how “easy” it is to set up and run a successful business. It is hard work. It will be hard work and there is no magic method that will change that. In my opinion it comes down to how much passion you have for what you are doing. If you love it enough, then the tough bits are just easier to go through and you realise it is worth it in order to achieve your goals.

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Venita:) Yes this is very true and it’s unfair for newbies starting up as they’re under the illusion of how easy it all is and then get frustrated when they quickly find out it’s not! And therefore gives the whole industry a very bad name which is a great shame.

      It does help if you love what you do and I think that often shows too, I’ve been complimented on that. I truly love what I do and wouldn’t change anything. Yes it’s hard work but then the best things in life are:)
      Twitter:

  57. Jessica says:

    Thanks for this post. I have always liked the “Fake it till you Make it” saying but the original meaning I believe is about confidence. Its not saying “fake” that you know how to do something or fake that you’re an expert when you’re not. Its okay to say you’re new or still learning but its not okay to make a bunch of self-depricating comments either. That won’t fly in business and everyone has to start someone. So that being said, a “healthy amount” of Fake it Till you Make it is okay as it applies to your CONFIDENCE.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jessica:) I think there is a huge difference between being confident and telling lies and faking it.

      In business it’s important to be confident, people are after all attracted to successful confident people. They want to feel safe that you’re going to deliver what you say you are and by being confident that you can deliver the goods does make a difference.

      What I find frustrating is when people don’t have a proven track record and completely lie, it’s misleading and damages the industry too.
      Twitter:

  58. Pingback: The BLOG Police Will Probably Arrest Me!!

  59. What a great post! Unfortunately those who are “faking it” really damage the credibility of everyone else to the people who are looking for help with social media and internet marketing! What is also unfortunate is that people feel like they either have to know everything and be successful at everything or be a “moaner” as you so appropriately called it. Many people have the idea they need to beg (moan, complain, beg, make people feel sorry for them), borrow (from their own future success by choosing quick fix solutions and unsustainable growth through inflated promises), or steal (copy others content and methods without credit, or even outright swindle the companies/individuals they are supposed to be working for).

    There is another road – a road that is paved with integrity and valuing others and leads to long term and sustainable success. It takes longer. It requires patience, humility, and courage, but it is possible.

    1) Be honest. That does not mean to just put yourself down all the time. You have weaknesses, don’t pretend that you don’t. But you have strengths too. Know what those are and be willing to talk about them. If someone wants you to do x and you are really good at y, say so. Refer them on to someone who IS good at x, or let them know that you have never done it before, but are willing to try if they are.
    2) Be willing to give a little. If you have never taken a photograph don’t expect to start charging top rates for your first client. If you have never managed a business account for Facebook, then offer to do it for free for a couple people for a set amount of time. Don’t make up experience you don’t have. I have done this many times to get into new areas. For example, one client I am managing their Facebook account, and feel like Google+ has a lot of potential for them. But this is a new platform, and I have never tried it. So I said that I would do the Google+ account for 6 months. I know at the end of that time if the client is getting results, they will be more than happy to pay for it. If not, then they don’t waste any money, and I have had a chance to learn a lot. In the meantime the client knows I have integrity and am sincerely trying to do what is best for them and their business. In the long run clients who love what I do and rave about me to others will ensure that I have a successful business. Clients who feel cheated and hate the work I do will ensure that I am out of business pretty quick.
    3) Learn, learn, learn. Give yourself the credentials by putting in the hard work to learn what you need to know. Attend webinars, read books, follow industry leaders, go to workshops and conferences, find a mentor, and repeat. It takes time, a LOT of time, to be a true expert in anything. If you are willing to put in the time you will reap the rewards of doing so.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Rivka, I love your comment:) I agree and it’s so frustrating that an industry such as internet marketing is tarnished so badly particularly when there are some really great people who are doing amazing things and giving some great value at the same time.

      I guess you always get one or two people who have to ruin things…!

      I’m a great believer in giving and try and follower the givers guide – the more you give, the more you get back:)

      I also do understand that if you’re a newbie you have to start somewhere but that’s the point. You have to be patient, it doesn’t happen overnight and in this business it’s much better to be honest than lie, it’s very easy to see through that, particularly with everything so available online now.
      Twitter:

  60. Always be authentic! Faking it means you are not
    Twitter:

  61. Great post, Lilach, tx. I don’t believe in “faking it until you make it”. If you need to get some clients and references when you start your business, any business, don’t charge for your services. If you do a good job, that client will vouch for you, and so your business starts to grow. That is how you start a good business. Not by faking it. If you don’t knwo what you are doing, you won’t succeed anyway. If you do, you will succeed and learn from experience. I wrote a blog “8 Marketing Trends to Implement in Your 2012 Marketing Plan” and one trend is to “Humanize Your Business!” by being authentic, real, sincere. and caring. You can check it out at http://www.ymarketingmatters.com. Thanks Yasmin
    Twitter:

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Yasmin:) I agree, business is about being authentic, real, sincere and caring.

      I do think part of the problem though is the hype in the industry. Be it internet marketing or setting up a business in general. So many people make out it’s easy when the reality is far from this.

      Thanks for sharing your blog, will check it out:)
      Twitter:

  62. Lee says:

    I was just thinking about this the other day. You see all these people who seemingly have such great success and you have to know they don’t really have it, and I have spent money on plenty of “programs” that seemed like they were going to be great and knowledgeable only to tell me things that I already knew. I think that people think that faking it till you make it will make eventually lead to success, but it doesn’t always and if you get caught up in the illusion of success without achieving it, then how do you back out of it? Where do you go when you have all the twitter followers and the Facebook fans and still no business? If you can’t turn followers, whether bought or not, into business, what’s the point in having them? I wrote an article about buying Twitter followers and buying love…you can buy each, but it’s so much more satisfying if you earn each through who you are and by being honest and real, after all, eventually, if you are faking it, it comes out in the end usually.
    Lee recently posted..Blending Families Brady Bunch StyleMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Lee:) I know what you mean about buying a program that under delivers and doesn’t teach you anything new. Such a let down!

      It’s scary that in today world you can literally buy anything. In fact I’m often asked whether you should buy fans/followers but I just don’t get why anyone would waste their money. They’re not targeted so how is it going to help?

      There are two things you can’t buy in this world and that’s health and love. And the same applies in business.
      Twitter:

  63. I followed you here from twitter. Thanks for sharing such an amazing post. I tempted to be real honest, because I’m an honest man. .. okay first off … Its a tragedy what happened to that Internet Marketer in the News. God bless his soul and be with his family.

    I know there are unfortunates but they are rare.

    The truth is disturbing! No matter how much you don’t agree with “Faking it” it is a MUST for many beginning internet marketers. If I didn’t do this in the beginning, than I wouldn’t be where I am today with all that I have learned. I don’t agree with lying. Like I said, I’m probably the most brutally honest man alive. he he!

    But is a MUST that one fake it til they make it.

    Unfortunately, it opens a BIG door for scams and shady practices that I DO NOT agree with.

    This is one of the best articles I’ve read in a long time stirring up a lot of thoughts in my crazy head. I’ll definitely share this post so you can receive more feedback!

    WOW!

    God bless,
    Curt aka CBiz
    Curt Bizelli recently posted..What Happens On The Internet, Stays On The Internet …My Profile
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    • Have to say the biggest mistakes new businesses make is faking it to make it, they don’t need to do it at all. That would be so 1980′s. Time to move on on business and be you not something you are not, real people will like you for doing that. Those who dno’t are embroiled in old fashioned pyramid or MLM sales.

      • Lilach says:

        Thanks Mark:) I agree it’s time to move on. To be fair though it’s not just people who are working within network marketers or MLM.

        Let’s hope things start to change soon for the better:)
        Twitter:

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Curt, great to see you here too:)

      It is a tragedy you’re right. It’s very sad and it’s also very frustrating that the industry does and continues to have such a bad reputation.

      I do wonder though who is responsible? Is it the person selling the hype or the naivety of the person buying and thinking that “get rich quick” exists… Perhaps that’s a debate for another blog post:)
      Twitter:

  64. The most salient point is the “. . . till you make it” portion of the phrase.

    It assumes that you’re doing your part in educating yourself and providing value to your clients. Do that enough times, and all of a sudden you’re not “faking” it. I also think that “Faking it” is a euphanism for giviing off the preception of success. So yes, I think it’s OK to “fake it till you make it”, as long as you’re working on your skills.
    Twitter:

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Robert:) I do disagree though. I think it’s much better to be real, authentic and honest. Yes it’s harder for someone new to get clients/make money etc. but we all had to start somewhere.
      Twitter:

  65. Great food for discussion as you can see from all the Comments this post has generated. If only my blog could do that! Here’s where I think you do need to fake it a bit: You should create a great impression with your marketing materials. You want to have a good looking office that makes people comfortable and supports the fees you are charging. In the beginning you are faking it a bit because you’re not successful yet.

    However, I’m not suggesting you fake your knowledge since that will bear out over time anyway. I’m merely saying that making a good impression that may suggest success not attained yet isn’t a bad thing as long as it’s backed up by real value.
    Michael Neuendorff recently posted..Are You Thinking Big?My Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Michael:) I don’t see how creating a good impression is faking it? Surely this is just being professional and building your reputation?

      If you’re new in business but not new in your skill-set trade etc. then I also don’t see that as faking…
      It certainly wouldn’t put me off using someone’s services just because they were new in business although had 10 years experience etc.
      Twitter:

  66. Honesty always pays in the long run. I just had a very agressive confrontation with someone who is quite well known in the media. He was extremely inauthentic in what he did. I am pleased to say that he has now been removed from his post.
    Twitter:

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Peter:) I agree it does pay off in the long run. Sorry to hear about your experience. I know someone who names and shames on Twitter… what are your thoughts on that? It’s something I’ve not done…
      Twitter:

  67. Lilach, as you have written, no, you shouldn’t fake it till you make it. The truth always comes out, even if it takes years. Being honest and having integrity is so much better then the hype. Thanks for your post about how you feel about the fakers and I always enjoy reading your posts.
    Tania Shipman recently posted..Blogging for Free Part 4 – SettingsMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Tania, appreciate your comment:) I agree, the truth does eventually come out. I’ve even seen it come out online although normally after someone has taken a lot of money from someone!!
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  68. Isn’t the statement a contradiction in terms.
    Fake it… is what it says. False, untrue, not real, without substance, an act.
    until you make it… is a time constraint that is endless. What until are people aiming at.

    I think Dino Dogan has one of the few points here that actually define the thing.
    He has 80% evidence of a shot at success.
    The 20% he will have to learn along the way until the …until…part! kicks in.

    I’ve had a lot of experience with the phrase that I think was started in the Multilevel Marketing Mess.
    There is the poster child for the what is being dangled on the screens of our computers.

    I’ve seen a 6million a year guy go down to living with his mother, when the real income, selling info on how to fake it to you make it, was cut off from him, because he wanted to cut out the people above him and start his own info biz.
    Aren’t we just seeing the MLM drivel pushed online?

    How can you live with a contradiction of terms? We see that eventually you don’t and the mess is awful.
    Billy
    Billy Delaney recently posted..The best bloggers ever, and the best tweets too! All at one site…My Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Billy:) I find the whole subject fascinating – it certainly makes a good debate.

      I’ve seen many people be incredibly successful and lose everything… and then get back up again and do even better so it can be done.

      I don’t think it’s just MLM “drivel” that’s to blame. There are many (not naming anyone) internet marketing products out there that have very little substance and the people behind them are maintaining they are hugely successful when the truth is very far away.

      I think everyone deserves the chance to be successful but I think it’s important that people who do the “selling” are more honest. We all have to start somewhere and the sooner the industry gets rid of the “get rich quick” products etc. the better.
      Twitter:

  69. Cindy Eve says:

    Hi Lilach, well I think you saw my immediate response on twitter a few minutes ago!! I am totally AGAINST this type of marketing and business value (not that it can be called a value). I joined an MLM company in 2005, by 2007 I was desperate & joined more, eventually I joined 8 in my desperation to ‘make it’ after seeing so many SUCCESSFUL marketers (and to be fair there were a few), but it eventually by 2008 it had cost me over £50,000.00!!! and it is still costing me. I have worked non-stop at a regular job for the last 4 years scraping my money together to pay off the debt, I have finally caved in and taken professional help, and I am stuck in a job that makes me very unhappy (altho I gave up and resigned last week). I am totally against this style of marketing, because it is easy to fake it on the internet and many many people I know are in financial trouble because of it. I joined the personal development world in 2007 coz I thought I was the failure, coz I wasn’t rich in 30days or whatever other **** they promise, and it almost cost me my sanity, and it DID cost me a whole heck of a lot of money and I am now worse off than I was before (financially) ….albeit more aware of the pitfalls, and a lot more cheerful!!! I used to have a life, travelling and doing stuff I enjoy…and now???? said with a huge *snort* of disgust! But, before this becomes a whole book :) let me end off by saying the I totally OPPOSE this form of marketing as it is unethical, dishonest, deceitful and yes, it does kill people. Maybe they don’t shoot themselves and their children, but they end up in despair and lose their homes, their families and their self-respect…..and I know from experience coz some of them are my friends. What I have learned in the past few years is that Internet Marketers start to sell their ‘training services’ : “I did it and so can you” when the system they have been using no longer works ie the twitter system that generates false accounts using bots that pounce on your profile using keywords. And that is a whole lot of shame coz internet marketing could & can be a really good way of generating income, but it MUST be done with total honesty and with a solid set of ethics.
    Sorry I have vented on your blog. If you feel you don’t want to approve this, I wont be offended. I just have very strong feelings about this.
    regards
    Cindy
    Cindy Eve recently posted..how to make the most of a weekendMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Cindy and I’m sorry to learn of your bad experiences.

      We have all been there though, you’re not alone and I’m a great believer in Karma and also learning from experiences – everything does happen for a reason although it may not feel like it at the time!

      It’s frustrating that the Internet Marketing industry and MLM have a bad reputation as there are many “good guys” out there, you just have to be careful:)
      Twitter:

  70. Great blog, I have had a couple of people try to knock me down, when I have looked in to their profiles on social media, google and linkedin, they are nothing but what they write, such as ‘world renowned expert’ or delve deeper and have been a scammer (There are a couple who have made millions with fake backgrounds and scams) etc. No experience listed previous to their sole proprietorship and I put it down to jealousy that they want to reign on my parade that I am working so hard to build without being fake or dishonest.
    So yes a lot of fakers out there, I could name a few now, but that’s just not my style. :)
    Michelle

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Michelle:) Yes I must admit as tempting as it is to “name and shame” but it’s also not my style…

      I see a lot of jealousy too online and have had some rather negative experiences which I can’t really elaborate on here for obvious reasons. Sadly people either support you and encourage you when you’re successful or have huge jealousy issues…
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  71. Hi Lilach I’ve seen this story before and I’m a bit uncomfortable seeing it bandied around as a tale of morality or indictment of Internet Marketers – Alas awful things happen in life and outsiders rarely see the full picture.

    I would agree that 99% of those chasing riches online will fail to live up to the hype and 1% will make a great living pitching the dream. That said the whole fake it till you make it scenario is actually misunderstood.

    Nearly every great success I’ve ever met has had a sense of self esteem and belief that is magnetizing. For most it takes years of personal development and rewiring the negative scripts of childhood to achieve and the key to attraction marketing is all about projecting success before manifesting it.

    The whole essences of Think and Grow Rich I believe. So if faking it means having a genuine aspiration to succeed and projecting it -great go for it cause the alternative is to to continue the greatest delusion in life -the false belief that you’re ordinary-

    Continued Success Lilach Cheers Kiaran
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Kiaran, appreciate your comment:)

      I’m all for having aspiration, passion etc. but I think there is a fine line between that and literally lying about things… that’s where the faking comes in which I really don’t like and find quite ugly.

      Why not keep things real and honest – we all have to start somewhere after all…
      Twitter:

  72. Sallyjane says:

    This is a really good article! With the internet being what it is, how can anyone fake anything? I am the go to person when it comes to researching. Bring up a question even in jest, and I will have the answer for you in a very short order. People are always amazed at the answer and in-depth detail I go into with my answers. My father and business partner is always amazed he will be mentioning something that he wants some more information on, and before he finishes his question I have a long detailed answer. That all said, if you are faking it and I decide to research you… Ummm… Yea, I can pretty much know where to go to find out the very nitty gritty on you! It is much easier than it use to be, because it is all out there on the internet now. Even in the old days I knew right where to go to find information, but it took me more time as I would have to siphon through public records and read micro fisch film and that could take time. Now I just pick up my computer and away I go. Someone asked for a geek to help them out on Twitter the other day. It was my second day of being on twitter seriously actually tweeting and not occassionally lurking. I had though done my research so when the question asking for a geek came up. I answered the question. This was a person with massive numbers of followers, and I was amazed that he was asking for help from a geek. Yes I am that geek, but you know there is so much out there to be learned and if you just do your homework you can do amazing things.
    The most important thing is to be authentic! People who know me know I have had a tough life, and that I don’t shy away from it either. I know for a fact that I have been an inspiration to those who are in those pits trying to find a way out, to really take courage and step out. People know me as a fighter, with a loving heart to help people. I love the fact that those who know me describe me as courageous. It blows me mind too. People like to know someone who has overcome serious obstacles and walls in their life. Authenticity can go a long ways towards success.
    The Entrepreneur is a special breed of person. I have been self employed my whole life. I don’t even really know what it is like to be an employee. Yes I have had a few jobs here and there, but mostly I always end up striking out on my own. I am a gutsy person, as people will tell you. Companies are always trying to hire me to sale for them, because I have no fear of walking into a room full of people and introducing myself, even if I am just out networking for a job. Even when I was in college I had my own business altering clothes for people. I also have to admit I had no problem playing a little game of liars dice at the bars I waitressed at. There is a big difference between lying and having a great poker face in a game of chance. I have often laughed about putting myself through college gambling. Well not completely, but I had a great poker face.
    A great poker face is confidence and lying is equal to stealing or fraud. I don’t do business with someone who brags about how much they make. I do business with people I like. For instance I liked your energy on Twitter so I started reading your blog, and from there I started following you and reading you new posts. People do business with people who they like! Oh I got off topic in this paragraph! Anyways there is risk in business. Just like when you place a bet on the table. I don’t play games of chance that I don’t know the odds in, but I know an entrepreneur will gamble with the appropriate risks. Someone employee minded will not gamble at all. Fools gamble without doing the right research, and play money they don’t have on tables that the odds are against them.
    Peace and Harmony, Sj
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    • Lilach says:

      Sallyjane thanks so much for your comment – I completely agree… being authentic and keeping it real wins every time:)

      Unfortunately though not everyone is as clever as you and does there research (still don’t understand the amount of people who buy things randomly without Googling it!!)

      And I also agree that people do business with those they like – after all people buy from those they like and trust:)
      Twitter:

  73. As with alot of industrys there are always lots of fakers. If your not genuine it will always shine through eventually. If your new be honest, because if your any good at whatever you do that will also shine through and build long lasting business relationships.

    Duncan Girvan (retail & leisure security specialist)
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  74. It’s a tragic story isn’t it? Unfortunately there are a lot of people “doing” social media who don’t get tangible results and they charge a huge amount of money for something my company gets better results at without even trying. But because we’re into “blogging” rather than the new buzz-words of “social media” small business owners can’t see beyond the hype and end up spending huge amounts of money for little return.

    I run a small company and like to be friends with our clients so they all know we’re brand new, they’ve watched us grow from zero and every single one of them would give us a testimonial for our services. I had to give a lot away for free at first to prove the worth of what we do and get those vital testimonials but now we’re getting the enquiries coming to us rather than us having to go to them. It’s a long, hard struggle to be successful on the Internet, but we’re getting there … slowly!

    “Fake it Until you Make It” is wrong because you’re mis-representing yourself. We portray a successful business (and we’re paying our bills so we can claim that) and have the clients to prove it now, but I meet so many people on the networking scene who obviously don’t know what they’re doing, it is quite sad and it’s easy to spot their nervousness, especially when they find out I’m a 20 year verteran in business and IT and really do know what I’m talking about.

    But, I suppose, how else do you get those first and all important clients and start to feed your family otherwise?
    Steffi Lewis recently posted..http://WWW.STEFFILEWIS.COM : Turn Your Face Toward The Sun : And feel energised again …My Profile

    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Steffi, I agree.

      It’s a tricky one… you have to start somewhere but why would you offer a service that you’re a complete newbie in i.e. have had no experience in… when I first set up my business whilst I hadn’t run a business before (which I openly stated) I had over 11 years experience in my industry so felt confident I could deliver.

      Great to see you practicing what you preach:)
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  75. Todd Gray says:

    I strongly disagree with the concept of “actually faking it” in terms of marketing oneself as being successful when the person is not. However your blog reminds me of a common fear experienced by many competent, legitimate professionals known as “Imposter Phenomena” which are essentially huge moments in people’s professional lives when they feel like they don’t know what they are doing and that they may not be qualified in terms of their job or position. In these moments, it is important for people to realize that they have a gift and they owe it to people to share it with them.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Todd, appreciate your comment:)

      You make a very interesting point and I think the problem stems from the fact that so many people are now entering the online world (and social media) as they think it’s easy and they can make a quick buck from it. The reality is that they aren’t experienced and are literally faking it and taking money from people with the promise of making money quickly….

      Genuine people shouldn’t have to fake it and as you say can share their gift openly with others:)
      Lilach recently posted..Buy a book and change the world….My Profile
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  76. Fantastic article. Just a couple days ago I received an email from a follower on Twitter asking me if I could send some articles their way because they were asked to run a brand’s social media but they didn’t fully know what social media was. With that said, will they fake it until they make it? I don’t know but is not worth the time to ponder on it.

    The trouble with faking it until you make it is it may work temporarily but as time progresses and you are faced with an issue in social media and have no clue how to take action, your image, reputation amongst other things become questionable. It is so sad to see these fakes out there and is our job as social media managers, consultants to educate brands on what and not to look for in choosing someone to help them.

    Thank you greatly for the amazing post.
    Jason Houck recently posted..Howdy Ya’ll From The SouthMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jason appreciate your great comment:)

      I’ve lost count of the amount of emails/tweets I’ve received from people asking me to help them with their social media and online marketing (when the reality is they’re offering it as a service?!!)

      I think part of the problem is that human beings are very impatient. We want fast results and we want them now and the reality is that it takes time. It takes time to build a business, a reputation etc.

      The great thing is that we can share our thoughts and hopefully educate people to understand what people should/nt be looking for when choosing someone to help them:)
      Lilach recently posted..Buy a book and change the world….My Profile
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  77. Alien Bob says:

    Very good post and nice to see the truth being put forward. Selling yourself will always be hard if you are too honest. The story goes that oncer they were losers but now they are winners and they can show you how – for a price. Truth is, unless you’re selling products for yourself or someone else, you’ll never make it online.
    Alien Bob recently posted..By: Lourdes CrazierMy Profile
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Alien, appreciate your comment.

      I don’t think that it’s hard if you’re too honest. I’ve always been incredibly honest and open, even when things haven’t gone as well as I would have liked! I’ve found that by being so transparent has actually worked in my favor and is probably one of the key reasons why my blog is as successful as it is today.
      Lilach recently posted..Buy a book and change the world….My Profile
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  78. Hi Lilach an honest and interesting insight. My view is that the world is crying out for profound honesty. There is nothing wrong with teaching someone how to do something that is tried and tested even if you’ve not had time to get these results for yourself. There is a skill in passing on information so if you are able to help people understand something that is complicated that others have proved has work I wouldn’t call that faking it. It’s when faking it becomes an outright lie that’s the problem. A positive confident attitude is one thing , making up testimonials and lying about income levels to attract customers is bad Karma and clearly will eventually come back to haunt you.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ola, appreciate your great comment:)

      There is a huge difference between “faking it” and outright lie. As you say, this is when the problems occur. Lying about your income and false reviews etc. is not great Karma and I’m a great believer in what goes around comes around.

      Honesty and being open, particularly when more and more business are online (or at least have an online presence) is becoming more important. It’s very easy to do a little bit of research and work out whether someone is saying the truth or not and we have to remember that what stays online stays.
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  79. good article there is a thin line between faking it till you make it because your sure your good and between lying that you are good but your not! I prefer to not fake it and just get their with good work and word of mouth recommendation. You can fake it a bit what is fine but to much is bad what is proof when those few came out to admit they weren’t successful!
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  80. Hi Lilach, For me social is about talking and meeting new people. For many it seems to be about numbers, though there are so so many Twitter accounts with thousands of followers and virtually no engagement going on which must feel like you are just talking to yourself. I have met quite a few successful bloggers who used Twitter automation products and somehow managed to sound personal and I had no problems following them. I also know a few people whose accounts were blocked because of using of such tools. Now that Twitter is suing TweetAdder and 4 other tool makers for allegedly spreading spam, using such tools may become not only ineffective but also illegal.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Tanya and please accept my apologies for the delay in responding to your comment:)

      I think it’s good that Twitter is suing TweetAdder and the other tools although it’s frustrating that marketers abused them in the first place as TweetAdder had a good search functionality on there.

      I do use automation tools to manage my Twitter (Buffer, Social Oomph, Hootsuite) but I think as long as you also have a personable voice and get the balance right it works well – it does for me anyway:)
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  82. Social Proof is always the way to go, and DIY as a proof of concept should be anyone’s first task.
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  83. Fake It Till You Make It… No Way!

    Instead of building platforms to elevate yourself above the very people you want to do business with, why not help people to achieve your success, no matter how moderate by teaching them to do what you do… not what you say.

    One of the biggest problems I see everyday is people being “sold” the dream from people who only make money from “selling the dream”.. They don’t actually do what’s in the manual..

    There is no need to “fake it till you make it” because the general standards of so called tuition are very low anyway out there. All you need to know is a little more than the next person in order to provide value and make sales..

    It’s senseless trying to make money telling people how to make $10,000 a month if you yourself are only making $500 a month.. Why not be honest and build a product around making $500 a month, be genuine, win followers & buyers who now trust you because you were honest and you showed them how to make $500 a month..

    If you lie and cheat people your time online is limited, you may have made money in the short term but I believe it will be the honest, transparent marketers who will still be here ROCKING IT in five years time or longer…

    Keith
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Keith, really appreciate your comment and I’m so sorry for the delay in responding.

      What you say is so true but what baffles me even more is that it really is irrelevant with how much money someone makes as it has no guarantee/impact that you will do the same! Not only that people often don’t declare how much they’ve had to spend in order to make that amount…

      I 100% agree “If you lie and cheat people your time online is limited, you may have made money in the short term but I believe it will be the honest, transparent marketers who will still be here ROCKING IT in five years time or longer…”
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  84. Eleanor jodway says:

    Thank You for Sharing this post Lilach. This is not just a problem with people in business. The Cyber World is a 2 dimensional World. The anonymity that it affords people, breeds dishonesty! It is ever more coming to light! Some of Twitter’s biggest Accounts, are not who they pretend to be! Many drive traffic to their accounts by buying follows, opening fake accounts to RT themselves, and the use services to do all of their legwork! If You follow their posts, there is nothing original, real, or unique in their Timelines. There posts are often quotes, or things that others have posted previously; that they do not give credit to. Their followings are so large, that no kudos You pay to them even matter. They are not personally interactive with their followers, unless they want to align themselves with them for infamy; believing their own hype so much that they think they are Social Media Stars! This is why I close My Night with #BEKIND…#BeReal on My Timeline! None of my posts are scheduled, all my pics are real, all of my Tweets are uniquely mine unless I RT, at which time I give credit to the person I am RT-ing. On all My profiles it says….”I am an ordinary woman”, which is exactly what I am! In My opinion…..if people were just REAL….themselves, laying bare the real facts; they would be NO LESS Likable! Dishonesty is NEVER an honorable trait!! And eventually, the truth ALWAYS comes out! And then what? You shoot Your baby and Your wife! There were people who would have rallied around this Man, if he just had of been honest, and reached out. YES, some would have run preferring not to share in his sadness…and they’re the ones who are not worth knowing anyway; but, many would have extended a hand of sympathy and understanding! Life is tough, and especially so these days! Sorry for the rant! :)
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Eleanor, really appreciate your comment (and not rant lol) and please accept my apologies for the delay in responding.

      Sadly what you say is so true and is increasing however the good news is that if people show a little common sense and simply Google them before clicking/buying etc. they can easily get found out as a spammer/fake etc.

      Yep life is tough but it’s also very short and we have to make the very best of it.

      Look forward to seeing you again here soon:)
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  85. I agree with the post Lilach, I cannot stand people who call themselves social media experts or gurus and haven’t an ounce of client work to back it up. However, even though you have posted this, i have to question which category you fall into?

    As you say, you google everyone which also means that people will do the same for your profiles. Lets start with your site, there are no clients listed, no testimonials, no success stories. Only a mobile number no office address and lots of pop ups for data capture for ’5 crazy ways to get traffic’.
    Your twitter profile self proclaims you are a ‘social media expert’, your linked in profile says you have only been running sociable or even been in the digital space at all for about 2 years. I wouldn’t class anyone with 2 years experience in anything as an expert.

    I could be completely wrong here and you could you ‘making it’ but have completely missed the boat in how to market your successes and services to create confidence in people who may want to use you, or are you faking it too?
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Justin for your comment and apologies for the delay in responding.

      You ask a good question, whilst I have only been with Socialable for 2 years I have been in business for nearly 7 years (having successfully sold a business 3 years ago). I “jumped on the bandwagon” of Twitter/Facebook in 2007/2008 when it was still fairly new and a lot of businesses weren’t using it to it’s true potential.

      In terms of testimonials and case studies you’re absolutely right and they should be on here, it’s an error on my part that I’m rectifying and amending the website, however you can find 100′s of testimonials on my other social media platforms including LinkedIN, Ecademy etc.
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  86. Deborah says:

    There are some people who do not want to go through the development process. I sincerely believe that these are the people who are willing to fake it. They want fast gratification without having to do any of the development work. When a person is faking it until they make it, they have to approach people who do not know enough to distinguish the difference.

    People who really want to make it take the time to dig in and do the root work. I have no doubt that it takes more than a nice website and a product to make it. It’s not easy but it is possible to be the real deal. But when you are real it’s due to the experiences that help to mold you into that person. You’ve got the knowledge of the mistake that were made as well as the successful experiences to draw from. And you never stop working to improve or to expand in ways that compliment what you do.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Deborah, really appreciate your comment and apologies for the delay in responding.

      Your comment is so true, unfortunately we live in a world where people are very impatient (and lazy) and want results immediately. When they set up a business they quickly realise it doesn’t happen this way – so they have two choices, going through the “development process” as you say or simply faking it and buying their way in… however not only is this approach ethically wrong it’s also a very short term strategy as they will inevitably get found out and as they haven’t gone through the development process, learnt the skills,experience etc. they literally have to start from scratch – not to mention have little or no credibility!
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  87. This article really hit home to me because I was taught to “fake” it and honestly, it never felt right which is why I didn’t succeed at it. Ii left a really bad taste in my mouth to not only do it but to see so many other falling for the same hype and not getting any results. When I stepped away and allowed my true authentic self to show that’s when success came. To many people chasing fantasies. The blind leading the blind and perpetuating the myth that the industry as a whole is bad when it isn’t. If we can be honest and recognize that any level of success means doing the work and being honest with your skills and talents we will all be better for it.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Golda for your comment and honesty, very refreshing:)

      I too have seen these kind of teachings and it really does leave a very bad taste in your mouth. It’s also frustrating as people are being taught to do this which only perpetuates the situation.

      Being successful doesn’t always equate to fancy cars/houses anyway… and I think the people that follow those types of dreams are living in a fantasy world that will do anything to get it.
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  88. Russ Avery says:

    Great article, Lilach. Lots of fakers out there and you have to feel for them – but how many were pushed down that route and how many are just greedy and looking for quick wins? It’s really interesting! Thanks for sharing. Great blog! Russ
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  89. Mark says:

    Its down to the individual I guess. So many services out there now, buy 10k twitter followers for $10! Who would want that? Similar to the guy you highlight in the story I guess but at the end of the day t(he)y are only fooling themselves.

    These fakes are easy to spot. Facebook pages with thousands of ‘Likes’ but zero interaction. Twitter accounts with no # or @ engagement history. I simply walk away, unfollow, unfriend, and ignore the people using such tactics.

    Each to their own. It’s taken me almost 4yrs to get just shy of 30k on Twitter, another 4 to increase that by 50% would be fine, it will be engaging and fun, which for me is what this is all about.

    Cheers,
    Mark.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Mark, appreciate your comment and apologies for the delay in responding. Is it only $10 now for 10k of followers? wow the price is going down lol

      I completely agree and simply walk away as you do. Interestingly I’m finding Facebook is now overtaking the spammy people as oppose to Twitter…

      I love your comment “Each to their own. It’s taken me almost 4yrs to get just shy of 30k on Twitter, another 4 to increase that by 50% would be fine, it will be engaging and fun, which for me is what this is all about.”
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  90. Ian says:

    There are so many ‘gurus’ out there right now who profess to be experts in this and that and telling us what we should be doing which is all very worrying. Unless people have actually been there and done it they shouldn’t even be attempting to fake it before they make it! I totally understand the whole visualisation thing but sometimes it’s easy to see through fakers who just haven’t got a clue. I met loads of business guru fakers on the internet and in real life and I wouldn’t trust half of them as you can see through their fakeness, yet they manage to command top fees (or have you believe that anyway) I have only come across a few people who are genuine gurus or business people and they have got down in amongst it and learned by doing rather than faking. I am one of them as I have built a business from nothing and nearly lost a business too. That’s the way you learn in business and in life. I love your tweets and content and I find it does nail down a lot of the right stuff, where lots on the net right now is just total waffle! Regards Ian
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Ian, really appreciate your comment and great feedback:)

      I completely agree, I too have lost a business – I think most successful entrepreneurs do. Running a business is like riding a roller-coaster, there will be highs, excitements as well as the lows and it’s all part of the fun!

      I guess I get frustrated when people don’t see past the fakes and believe in all the hype but then some people truly want the fantasy of having the fancy cars/houses etc. and perhaps need to learn the hard way that this simply isn’t reality. We have to work for it, and it’s hard work too sometimes!
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  91. Ian says:

    There are so many ‘gurus’ out there right now who profess to be experts in this and that and telling us what we should be doing which is all very worrying. Unless people have actually been there and done it they shouldn’t even be attempting to fake it before they make it! I totally understand the whole visualisation thing but sometimes it’s easy to see through fakers who just haven’t got a clue. I met loads of business guru fakers on the internet and in real life and I wouldn’t trust half of them as you can see through their fakeness, yet they manage to command top fees (or have you believe that anyway) I have only come across a few people who are genuine gurus or business people and they have got down in amongst it and learned by doing rather than faking. I am one of them as I have built a business from nothing and nearly lost a business too. That’s the way you learn in business and in life. I love your tweets and content and I find it does nail down a lot of the right stuff, where lots on the net right now is just total waffle! Plus surely faking it as a business is not great from a trading standards point of view or that just me? Regards Ian
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  92. enzo testa says:

    I think it may be ok to fake it a little in the beginning to get you going. It’s almost the same as telling a little harmless white lie ;)
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  94. Haven’t you heard? All the world’s a stage….

    There’s a whole blog post here where I could take both sides of the issue, but I stand by my original tweet reply: The quick answer is yes.

    You’re simply reframing the argument. At some point, you’ll have to actually show some modicum of success, and ultimately at that point, you will have made it.

    Then you get to start over ;)
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks for your great comment.

      Yes it’s true the world’s a stage and with the Internet and particularly social media it’s definitely becoming a smaller place:)

      I think the whole “faking it” really does boil down to how far you’re prepared to fake it. We all have to start somewhere but the lying about the whole income side of things just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
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  95. Nicole says:

    I think there is an element of ‘fake it until you make it’ with businesses because as you have said it’s important your customers get a positive image. However I think there is a way to do this. For example we started our business and were very honest with the first customer we had through the doors, we told them this was our first time running their choice of programme and in return for their feedback they were given flexibility on the price. The quote and testimonials we got after that we’re exactly what we needed to ‘arm’ ourselves going forward. We didn’t fake our success but we did create the illusion we we’re a bigger team by the language we used. We have never been dishonest with customers and we are fortunate that today we are doing well, yet in the beginning we did ask ourselves, would our customers want to buy from an established company or a new one? Then again this analysis helped us target the right audience, after all we were a new one! I think those that do fake their success are risking their customers loyalty. People are far more careful who they spend their money with and telling them you have lied for years would make me personally feel cheated. Never lie to your customers, never lie to anyone, trust and respect is built on communicating honestly. If we expect honesty from them, they should definitely receive it back.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Nicole. I really love your comment. You went for a great and refreshingly honest approach that clearly works.

      Customers respect honesty and are more likely to hire you again and recommend you if they’re happy. I appreciate it’s hard when first starting out in business, I remember when I first started out that I actually played on the fact we were a new business as we bought fresh ideas and experience, so whilst we were a new business, we still had the skill-set and experience to back up our credentials. Sometimes new is good as well:)
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  96. This is really interesting. I am pretty new to this game and I really do feel that it is a game, and like any good game, there are rules to follow to a) level the playing field and b) to ensure the game is played properly and works for everyone.

    I think there are always going to be people who think faking it is the best way forward, and they will probably see short term gains, but for the long game, for sustainability, for reputation and strategy that sees repeat business, or returning readers, the truth always wins for me!

    Marketing is pretty much packaging something up in an appealing way that encourages people to buy what you are selling. I wonder how much business would get done if honest marketing existed…. “you don’t really need this product but we think it’s great and would encourage you to buy it”. Sounds like a wonderful alternate reality.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Amy, really appreciate your great comment:)

      You’re so right, business is a game, the more you know the rules and how to play them the better… although sometimes it’s” good to break the rules and make your own up!

      I actually think honest marketing is working better now and am seeing a shift in general, particularly with advertising. Glossy selling really isn’t as effective as it was years ago, there is now a need for a more subtle and even humorous way of selling.
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  97. Elena Anne says:

    The vast potential for anonymity on the internet provides people with the opportunity to ‘fake it’ and act solely for self-interest. To do so, to an excessive degree, may make you ‘successful’ and you may make money, but you do so at the risk of losing something else.
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  98. People don’t want to follow anyone who is not going places.

    So, it behooves the internet marketer/leader to convince his readers or circle of friends that he/she is successful.

    In truth, a person’s past success is relevant only because it is a predicter of future success. If you can convince me that you are going places, I don’t have to see past success to believe in you. Just show me a good plan, and I will cheer you on to your success.
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  99. David says:

    Interesting. You have great articles. However, doesn’t everyone have to start somewhere? You can’t have been doing it that long as SM has only been around for a few years. How did you begin with nothing?

    David
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks David, appreciate your comment. You’re right everyone has to start somewhere. I’ve been using social media since 2007/2008 so not long. I started my first business in 2006 and was very honest that it was a new business, in fact I had never run a business before but the business I went in I had 15 years experience from so sold on that basis. I actually found the fact that I was new in business was a key selling point… sometimes it really does pay to be honest and transparent, after all the old saying “people buy from those like and trust” still wins in my book:)
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  100. Richard says:

    Nice article Lilach
    Spot on – way too many ‘fakers’ out there. It’s one thing to walk the walk and talk the talk, quite another to call yourself an expert when in fact you’re just starting out. It’s the ‘quick buck’ syndrome I reckon.
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  101. E Young says:

    In your first sentence: *hear, not ‘here’

  102. Good post topic!

    I think that is a fairly accurate assumption that most internet marketers aren’t making nearly what they claim to be with their product.

    A little bit of common sense goes a long way, if someone has a way to make thousands of dollars per day, do you think they would sell it?

    I recommend most people stay away from information products, most e-books are rewritten and out-dated techniques, most of which are common methods that be found with little research.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jude, appreciate your comment.

      Sadly I think it’s true that a lot of internet marketers don’t always make what they claim to… or more importantly it maybe that they do but they had to spend $xxx to get there so their profits are actually very low.

      There are a lot of information products out there that are of poor quality, that said I’ve downloaded some really great resources that have provided me with a lot of value. But you do have to shift through a lot of them before you find the gems!
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  103. Jay says:

    Reality check! – I have used the words ‘maverick’ and ‘entrepreneur’ in my twitter profile (others too probably) – won’t be using them again!! I think the web allows and maybe even encourages us to hide behind a facade, but I believe you can probably have more success just being yourself. On the other hand, having a persona (as long as it is not deliberately deceptive) can be a useful device. Tricky subject, a bit close to home for many of us I reckon. Nice post Lilach (or whoever you really are..)
    Jay (probably not my real name)
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  104. Hi Lilach,

    Great article and talking point and definitely something I have seen and experienced and admittedly in the past have been tempted by myself.

    I am lucky in that non of the mentors in business I have chosen have ever advocated ‘faking it to make it’ strategies and in fact have extolled the virtues of a business in alignment with your personal values and character.

    I have come to the conclusion that ‘faking it’ falls into two categories (ignoring the faked pleasure when you get a Christmas gift really makes you cringe). So, are you feeling like a fake? Or are you actually faking it to others?

    Firstly, I think it is very easy when we start out in business or putting our personality out to the world that we can feel like a fake. Who validates that we have a valid opinion? Who qualifies that we are suitably experienced to advise others? What level of results do we need to have achieved to be claim expertise? Do we need to have 10,000 hours of experience to be an expert?

    The answer is obviously personal, but the more I have pondered the topic, the more I have concluded that it is down to a) whether you have gotten knowledge and results for yourself and b) whether you have helped others do the same.

    In the words of John Gray, “sometimes you just have to ‘Hang your hat’” and decide that you are now knowledgable enough to pass on that insight to others.

    Secondly, with regards to faking it to others, comes down to whether what you are saying is true and can be evidenced if asked to do so. And the way to move from ‘no results’ to ‘results’ is to; dare I say it; offer your services for free! I am well aware that this does not fit into the get rich quick models that are perpetuated around the net these days, but it allows you to be completely genuine in your claims.

    Therefore I believe the authentic model goes like this: 1) Gather knowledge and information; 2) put it through due diligence – is there specific evidence of it working in practice, 3) test it out for yourself if possible, 4) offer the service to friends, family or select customers for FREE to get feedback, test principles and generate positive outcomes, 5) gather genuine testimonials from those you have helped, 6) put it out to the world as a charged service/product, backed by real-life results.

    I think the biggest battle is with ourselves. Once we have overcome the category 1 feeling of fakeness [is that actually a word] and are happy in our own skin with our level of knowledge, understanding and expert positioning, there is no need to fake it to others… So ask yourself the question, ‘What would it take for you to not feel like a fake?’
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    • Lilach says:

      Matt thanks so much for your awesome comment. I really appreciate you taking the time to leave your thoughts.

      You raise some very interesting questions, particularly how much skill-set/knowledge does it take before someone really knows what they are doing? And in many cases you can’t measure that i.e. there are no rules (for example some professions have to have carried out a minimum of x hours). And also it goes back to it’s not really about how much experience, for example you can have 100 hours of learning to drive and someone else could have had 10 but simply be a better driver…

      Anyway I digress, I think you nailed it in your last paragraph – I love your question “What would it take for you to not feel like a fake” :)
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  105. Hollie says:

    After 10 years of blogging, I now work in Social Media, and am just starting the company I work for social presence. It was begun by faking it..and I had to go in and quickly correct that.

    You can buy the numbers: fans, comments, etc but they will never lead to real engagement or to bettering the bottom line, I am thankful I have a company owner who agreed. He wants what is best and I am grateful for that..so we restarted. I am now working it building one relationship at a time.

    Isn’t that really what being social is all about, building one at a time, and that does take time and effort.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Hollie, appreciate your comment and your honesty.

      It’s scary how much “falseness” you can buy online – sites like fiver have a lot to answer for in my opinion!

      I agree being social is ultimately about building relationships and engaging with them. It takes time to build up trust and only then will people start to buy from you which is after all why we’re in business.
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  106. Jackson Kamau says:

    That is a tricky topic yet very essential. People tend to build an empire in non-existing land. I know it is hard to sell the truth but when you do you own the market. However, you should spice up your truth to make it appealing to the public.
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    • Lilach says:

      Thanks Jackson, appreciate your comment. And yes it is and continues to be a very tricky subject.

      I think it’s better to be honest and transparent but of course it’s about “spicing it up” to make it as appealing as possible.

      Ironically I’ve found that when I’ve been brutally honest I’ve had much better results anyway:).
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  107. John Obidi says:

    Thanks, Lilach. This article is truly a breath of fresh air. A lot of times, the ‘fake it till you make it’ mantra is peddled even in my circle and I lack factual points to debunk it, even though I detest it. Thankfully, this gives me a totally fresh perspective.
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  108. Lee Majella says:

    Don\’t think of it as \’faking\’, Think of it as practicing for success. A dress rehearsal for the success you know is coming and deserved. At work, when we are asked to temporarily fill a position above our pay grade, they call it \’acting up\’. The job the isn\’t yours, permanently. But, for that time, you are being asked to assume that role and the responsibilities. Nothing is promised, but what a great opportunity to showcase yourself for that job, or something similar.

  109. Mike Smith says:

    Hi Lilach
    Got this link from twitter. You market yourself everywhere and do it so well.
    I believe that people are basically good, well about 60% of them, and unfortunately the 40% of bad one’s are on the internet promising the earth. On the plus side over time you get to know the good ones, those are people like yourself, who you know, really know that you can trust. I’ve been developing a online business over the past 18 months, not been selling anything just bit by bit building an online presence and not making any promises I cannot keep. I believe in being honest, it’s ingrained in my DNA that’s who I am.
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  110. I do me better than anyone else – borrowed from Lou Reed
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  111. geekmom says:

    People should really not fake it until they make it. Many people will see right through the garbage. If you don’t have trust then you don’t have a business.
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  112. I see this so much now, especially when looking through Google and LinkedIn. There seem to be a lot of people out there who are faking a lot and giving out the wrong or scraped information.

    Many of these people aren’t trying to lead the way or change thought processes and expand a field. They are trying to piggyback and sell their scraped information as if they know better.

    As said, you have to practice what you preach and if these types of people are asking for advice then they are simply not doing that. If I wanted to work freelance as a social media person I feel I could, and I have the knowledge and know-how to back it up. I wouldnt ask someone else if I am ready, as that is clear indicator you’re not. I am ‘relatively’ new to social media from a business POV, but I feel my knowledge suprasses a lot of those who call them selves experts reposting old topics and pointless information.
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  114. fake it til you make it is only good if you are talking about confidence. Other than that, it’s deceptive and wrong.
    Brian Couch recently posted..Vemma Reviews-Is This Liquid Crack Actually Worth Millions?My Profile
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  115. I see a lot of people doing this. I think it’s because they feel if they don’t tell people they’re a professional, then they won’t listen to them. But the main thing to do in blogging through social media is to just be yourself!

    We’ve got too many “pros” out there. I want to see a newbie…and I read a lot of new bloggers. More refreshing!
    Wade Harman recently posted..The Facts About Facebook Marketing ToolsMy Profile
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  116. Pingback: Should you fake it ’til you make it in social media?

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